2019 Fullerton District Champs
Dates: 3/16/2019

 

 

Fullerton Elementary School District

Speech and Debate

 DISTRICT CHAMPIONSHIP

2019

 

This Tournament is only for
Fullerton Elementary School Districts
 
 
What: Speech & Debate Tournament
 
When:  March 16th
 
Where: Ladera Vista Junior High School, 1700 E Wilshire Ave, Fullerton CA 92831
 
Contact: 714-913-3515, 626-202-7337
 
School Tournament Fee - 50.00
Judging Bond Fee - 200.00
Individual Event Fee - 15.00 per event
Team Events, Public Forum, Duo - 30.00
Late Drop Fees on March 13th - 10.00
Late Drop Fees after March 13th - 20.00
Drops on March 12th - No Fee
 
Student, Coaches, and Judges Food Provided
 
All entries must be in by March 8, 2019 without exception
 
Events:
 
 
Original Oratory
Duo Interpretation
Informative
Dramatic Interpretation
Humorous Interpretation
Poetry Interpretation
Declamation
Prose Interpretation
Storytelling
Impromptu

Elementary Oratory
Elementary Declamation
Elementary Informative
Elementary Storytelling
Elementary Prose
 
 
General Information:
 
Students may double enter only in Pattern B individual events, students entered in Pattern A (Public Forum)  may NOT double enter.
Students advancing to the semi-finals will receive medals. Students advancing to the final round will receive a trophy.  Elementary schools will recieve trophies.  Elementary Schools will be awarded one sweepstakes award for the top elementary team.  
We will provide Intermediate Schools sweepstakes awards for the top five schools and top three small schools
 
Sweepstakes Points are as follows:
1st Place -            20 pts
2nd Place -          15 pts
3rd Place -          10 pts
4th Place -            8 pts
5th Place -            6 pts
6th Place -            5 pts
Semi-Finalist -     4 pts
 
 
Duo Interpretation and Public Forum events are double points
Each school may enter a maximum of 15 entries for each event.  Schools will be allowed to enter 5 Public Forum teams per school.
 

Public Forum Topic:

Resolved: On balance, the current authorization for use of military force gives to much power to the President.

 

 
Poetry Rules

1. Poetry: Poetry is writing which expresses ideas, experience, or emotion through the creative arrangement of words according to their sound, their rhythm, their meaning. Poetry may rely on verse and stanza form. The cutting may consist of a collection of poems on a common theme.

2. Selections: Original work, poetry downloaded from the internet, published poetry, and printed works may be used. No plays or other dramatic non poetry material is allowed. A student may not use the same source they used in Duo, Dramatic, or Humorous at any Association tournament.

3. Time: The maximum time of presentation is 7 minutes with a 30-second “grace period.” If there are multiple judges in the round, all must agree that the student has gone beyond the grace period. Should a student go beyond the grace period, the student may not be ranked 1st.

4. Presentation: Performances must be from a manuscript (which should be in a black binder). Reading from a book or magazine is not permitted. The student should be memorized but must make contact with the book at least three times the performance. Students may use one entire poem or multiple poems to reinforce the student’s theme. Pieces may be interred spliced and a page turn should be used when moving from one poem to the other.

5. The program: Should be structured as follows: A) Each program must start with a teaser that can range between thirty seconds to a minute in length. B) A student can perform one poem or multiple poems in the teaser. C) After the teaser is complete, the student should close the binder and address the audience with their argument and theme, this is called an intro.

6. Students are allowed to look at their book. Students should be memorized and give the illusion of reading. A student must look down at least once before turning a page. It is expected that the student makes eye contact with the book throughout the performance. Students should not simply read from the text in the binder.
 
Informative Speaking Rules

1. This contest shall comprise of an informative speech composed by the contestants. Two visual aids are permitted.
2. Subject: Any appropriate subject may be used, but the orator must be truthful. Any non-factual reference, especially a personal one, must be so identified. A student may not reuse the same speech topic from any competition in a previous academic year, or in Original Oratory.
3. Length: Delivery shall require not more than 5 minutes with a 30-second “grace period.” If there are multiple judges in the round, all must agree that the student has gone beyond the grace period. Should a student go beyond the grace period, the student may not be ranked 1st. There is no other prescribed penalty for going over the grace period. The ranking is up to each individual judge’s discretion. Judges who choose to time are to use accurate (stopwatch function) timing devices. No minimum time is mandated.
4. Quotation: Not more than 75 words of the speech may be direct quotation from any other speech or writing.
5. Script: The coach of record at the tournament should have a complete copy of the student’s manuscript speech, should a question arise. The manuscript should identify the quoted materials, state the number of quoted words.
6. Visual Aids: If a student is using visual aids, an easel must be used to hold the visual aids.
7. The structure of the speech should be as follows: Students begin with an attention getter better known as an introduction. Next, the student should provide the audience with an explanation of what they will discuss. This is also known as a sign post; for example – Today, we explore aliens in our universe. I will first give a brief history of alien sightings, second, discuss alien abductions and finally, examine alien life forms in our oceans today.
After the sign post they move into their first point, followed by the second and the third point. After they have performed the body of the speech they move into the review and conclusion. All speeches are written similar to a five paragraph essay.

Original Oratory


1. Contest: This contest comprises only memorized orations actually composed by the contestants and not used by them during a previous contest season. No visual aids are permitted.
2. Subject: Any appropriate subject may be used, but the orator must be truthful. Any non-factual reference, especially a personal one, must be so identified.
3. Length: The time limit in Original Oratory is 8-10 minutes with a 30-second “grace period.” If there are multiple judges in the round, all must agree that the student has gone beyond the grace period. Should a student go beyond the grace period, the student may not be ranked 1st. There is no other prescribed penalty for going over the grace period. The ranking is up to each individual judge’s discretion. Judges who choose to time are to use accurate (stopwatch function) timing devices. No minimum time is mandated.
4. Quotation: Not more than 150 words of the oration may be direct quotation from any other speech or writing.
5. Script: The orator's script must identify the quoted materials, state the number of quoted words, include a work cited page in APA or MLA format. It is the responsibility of the coach to have a script ready upon request should the speech be challenged.
6. Re-Use: A student may not use an oration the student used in district or national competition in any previous contest year
7. The structure of the speech should be as follows: Students begin with an attention getter better known as an introduction. Next, the student should provide the audience with an explanation of what they will discuss. This is also known as a sign post; for example – So today let’s own up and take responsibility. First, let’s take a good hard look at what owning up actually means, then, accept the fact that it’s hard to admit when we’re wrong and finally buckle down and understand how we can own up like a grown up.
After the sign post they move into their first point, followed by the second and the third point. After they have performed the body of the speech they move into the review and conclusion. All speeches are written similar to a five paragraph essay.

Duo Interpretation Rules
This category is performed by two people and it can be humorous literature, as well as emotive appeal, with selections drawn from, printed: novels, short stories, plays, poetry, or other printed, published works as well as limited online works as provided for in the rules below.


1. Divisions: Contests are conducted in Duo Interpretation.
2. Length: The time limit in Interpretation Main Events (Humorous, Dramatic and Duo Interpretation) is 8- 10 minutes with a 30-second “grace period.” If there are multiple judges in the round, all must agree that the student has gone beyond the grace period. Should a student go beyond the grace period, the student may not be ranked 1st. There is no other prescribed penalty for going over the grace period. The ranking is up to each individual judge’s discretion. Judges who choose to time are to use accurate (stopwatch function) timing devices. No minimum time is mandated.
3. Material: Selections used in these contests must be cuttings from a single work of literature —from one short story or one play, or one novel —as described in the following subsections:
A. Print Publications: includes novels, short stories, screen plays, plays; At SAUSD competitions only pieces of literature do not have to be published in print.
NOTE: In addition to print sources, certain online materials are allowed. Also, if a treatment of a movie script is ordered from a company that provides printed movie scripts, keep the original treatment, receipt, and proof of mailing (envelope).
4. Performance: The presentation may not use physical objects or costuming. During the presentation the contestant/team must name the author and the book or magazine from which the cutting was made. Additionally:
A. Adaptations to material may only be used for the purpose of transition. The gender stated by the author must be honored. (A student cannot change the gender of the character) However, a female contestant may play a male role, and a male contestant may play a female role.
B. Duo Interpretation selections must be presented from memory.
C. In Duo Interpretation each of the two performers may play one or more characters so long as performance responsibility in the cutting remains as balanced as possible.
D. Videos of previous final round performances are intended to provide educational examples for coaches and students. They are not intended to serve as a model to directly imitate or duplicate in performance.
5. Focus: In Duo, use of focal points and/or direct contact with the audience should be determined by the requirements of the literature being interpreted. In Duo Interpretation, focus may be direct during the introduction [the performers may look at each other and touch but ONLY during the intro] but must be indirect [off-stage] during the performance itself.

Prose Interpretation

1. Introduction:  The introduction should name the work and author, provide necessary background information, and establish the mood.

2.  Material Student must use a black book with the script inside.  The student should be able to capture and convey the emotional and intellectual depth of the character or characters, as well as the development of both the characterization and plot.  The student can only use prose material.  Monologues of any kind are NOT allowed in Prose.  Poetry pieces are also NOT allowed.

3.  Length: The time limit for Prose is 5 to 7 minutes with a 30 second grace period.

4.  Judging Criteria: This form of oral interpretation uses a single, published short story, part of a novel, or essay.  It may be fictional or non-fictional and dramatic/humorous in tone.  The title and author must be included in the introduction.  Elements of narration and dialogue can be combined.  The contestant must hold a manuscript but not be reliant on it.  The contestant should give the illusion of reading and the contestant should make contact with the script a minimum of four times during the presentation.

Story Telling:  Students select a published story that meets a designated theme.  Themes range widely and may include mysteries, heroism, or fairy tales.  Students choose a story that would be appropriate for you children ( think Kindergarten age ) and tell the story as if presenting to that audience.  Students may use a chair.

The contestant must have a teaser followed by the introduction.  The introduction should contain a brief explanation of the program.  An argument could be used to give the performance social significance.  The student should include the authort and title during the introduction.

Speaking time is 3 to 5 minutes with a 30 second grace period.

 

Dramatic Performance


1. Introduction: The introduction should name the work and author, provide necessary background information, and establish the mood. 8 to 10 minutes in length with a 30 second grace period.
2. Material: Single or multiple character cuttings should be considered equally. The student should be able to capture and convey the emotional and intellectual depths of the characters, as well as the development of both the characterization and plot. Consideration may be given to the literary merit of the selection. Students may use dramatic monologues, humorous monologues or any prose material.
3. Characterization: Each character should be interesting, engaging, and lifelike. The performer should create a physical, vocal, and temperamental existence suited for each character. The performer should keep these choices consistent. The performer should use his or her face, eyes, and body to create the characters effectively. Each character should show the intent of what he/she is wanting, thinking, feeling, and remembering when speaking and reacting. Characters should appropriately develop and/or deepen as the plot or story line progresses. • Multiple Characterizations (if used): The transitions when moving from one character to another should be clean and crisp. The pacing of transition should reflect the tempo of the interaction.
4. Environment: Each character should create a world around him or her. Movement should be used to create a three-dimensional environment in which the characters exist. Pantomime, if used, should be accurate and realistic. Gestures should be fully realized, creating in just the right way what the performer intends the audience to see. When doing a multiple character selection, the performer should create effective interaction between the characters.
5. Overall Effect: The overall performance should build to various moments and have a climax. The story should be complete and easy to follow. The performance should display another world outside of the performance space.
6. Additional Judging Criteria: The presentation may be either serious or humorous. Important consideration should be given to the quality of the selection. While singing is permitted, it should not be excessive or dominate the performance. Judges’ ranks may reflect if singing has dominated the performance. Single or multiple character cuttings will be allowed. When doing a multiple-characterization the performer should create effective interaction between the characters. Although this is primarily a display of vocal ability, body language will play a part in the overall performance, and since it is a drama, more vocal and physical suggestion may be required in order to portray characters, conflict, and story. However, no physical action should be performed that will distract the listeners' attention from the drama being presented. The performance should display another world outside the performance.
7. Length: The time limit in Original Oratory is 8-10 minutes with a 30-second “grace period.” If there are multiple judges in the round, all must agree that the student has gone beyond the grace period. Should a student go beyond the grace period, the student may not be ranked 1st. There is no other prescribed penalty for going over the grace period. The ranking is up to each individual judge’s discretion. Judges who choose to time are to use accurate (stopwatch function) timing devices. No minimum time is mandated.

Declamation Rules


1. Length: Declamation is a 8- 10 minute event with a 30-second “grace period.” If there are multiple judges in the round, all must agree that the student has gone beyond the grace period. Should a student go beyond the grace period, the student may not be ranked 1st. There is no other prescribed penalty for going over the grace period. The ranking is up to each individual judge’s discretion. Judges who choose to time are to use accurate (stopwatch function) timing devices. No minimum time is mandated.
2. Source: The speech must have been delivered in public and available in print or internet. (Copies from a publicly available website will also be sufficient).
3. The speaker should present an introduction that states the title, author, and date of the speech they are reciting.


Basic Public Forum Instruction


1. Resolution: On the top of the page


2. Entries: An entry is comprised of two students from the same school; each debating both sides of the resolution and advancing on its own record. No substitution is permitted once the tournament has begun.


3. Procedure and Order of Speeches: Prior to EVERY round and in the presence of the judge(s), a coin is tossed by one team and called by the other team. The team that wins the flip may choose one of two options: EITHER the SIDE of the topic they wish to defend (pro or con) OR the SPEAKING POSITION they wish to have (begin the debate or end the debate). The remaining option (SIDE OR SPEAKING POSITION) is the choice of the team that loses the flip. Once speaking positions and sides has been determined, the debate begins (the con team may lead, depending on the coin flip results). Following the first two constructive speeches, the two debaters who have just given speeches will stand and participate in a three-minute “crossfire”. In “crossfire” both debaters “hold the floor.” However, the normal edict is to allow the speaker who just gave their speech to ask the first question. After that question, either debater may question and/or answer at will. At the conclusion of the summary speeches, all four debaters will remain seated and participate in a three-minute “Grand Crossfire” in which all four debaters are allowed to cross-examine one another. The speaker who gave the first summary speech must ask the first question.

Public Forum Speeches and Time Limits

 

Speaker 1 (Team A, 1st speaker) 2 min

Speaker 2 (Team B, 1st speaker) 2 min

Crossfire (between speakers 1 and 2) 2 min

Speaker 3 (Team A, 2nd speaker) 2 min

Speaker 4 (Team B, 2nd speaker) 2 min

Crossfire (between speaker 3 and 4) 2 min

Speaker 1 (Team A, 1st speaker summary) 2 min

Speaker 2 (Team B, 1st speaker summary) 2 min

Grand Crossfire (All Speakers) 3 min

Speaker 3 Final Focus 2 min

Speaker 4 Final Focus 2 min
Each Team May Use 2 Minutes of Prep Time

4. Plans/Counterplans: In Public Forum Debate, the Association defines a plan or counterplan as a formalized, comprehensive proposal for implementation. Neither the pro or con side is permitted to offer a plan or counterplan; rather, they should offer reasoning to support a position of advocacy. Debaters may offer generalized, practical solutions.


6. Prompting Philosophy: Oral prompting, except time signals, either by the speaker’s colleague or by any other person while the debater has the floor, is discouraged though not prohibited and may be penalized by some judges. Debaters may, however, refer to their notes and materials and may consult with their teammate while they do not have the floor and during the Grand Crossfire.


7. Use of Electronic Devices: The use of laptop computers is permitted at the National Tournament. The use of laptop computers at the qualifying tournament will be the autonomous decision of each district. Laptop use must comply with the Guidelines for Laptop Use in Debate Events.
8. Timing: Timekeepers are an option but not required. If no timekeeper is used, debaters may time for their partners or the judge may keep time. Prep time for each team is two minutes.

Congress: A simulation of the U.S. legislative process, students generate a series of bills and resolution for debate.  Debaters alternate delivering speeches for and against the topic in a  group setting.  An elected students serves as a presiding officer to ensure debate flowsw smoothly.  Students are assessed on their research, argumentation, and delivery skills, as well as their knowledge and use of parliamentary procedure.

1. For the this tournament, congress debate is 2 1/2 hours long.  Students will debate two bills.  Students can call for a recess at any time.

2.  Super congress is the final round.  Students will debate three bills and the round will be 3 hours long.  We are using the NSDA national format.

3.  Students will elect of a presiding officer. The presiding officer must be elected with a majority of the vote- if one candidate does not receive a majority of votes, eliminate the candidate with the fewest votes and vote again.

4.  If candidates are tied for the fewest number of votes, vote to determine which of the tied candidates should remain in contention. Repeat this process until one candidate receives a majority of votes.

5.  When more than one speaker seeks the floor, the presiding officer must follow the precedence/recency method:

A) First recognize students who have not spoken during the session.

B) Next recognize students who have spoken fewer times.

C) Then recognize students who spoke earlier (least recently).  

D)  Before precedence is established, the presiding officer should recognize speakers fairly and consistently. They may not link recognition of speakers to previous recognition of students asking questions, moving motions, or longest standing (standing time).

E) During any session, precedence/recency should not reset, to ensure that all students in a chamber have an equal opportunity to speak and receive evaluation from scorers. When a new session begins, precedence/recency will be reset.

F) Before precedence is established, the presiding officer should explain their recognition process and it must be fair, consistent and justifiable.

G) Scorers will include answers to questions when evaluating speeches.

H) A speaker may yield time on the floor during debate (for questions or clarifications) but that speaker will remain in control of their three minutes.

I) The first negative speech must be followed by 1 minute of questions. 

J) Following the first two speeches on legislation, the presiding officer will alternately recognize affirmative and negative speakers, who will address the chamber for up to 3 minutes, followed by 1 minute of questioning by other delegates. 

CONGRESS BILLS POSTED BELOW:
 

A Resolution to Condemn Israeli Settlements in Palestine
WHEREAS, Israel is currently constructing settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem, areas set aside for a future Palestinian state; and
WHEREAS, More than 300,000 settlers are encroaching on privately-held Palestinian land; and
WHEREAS, The current Israeli settlements are damaging the prospects for a peaceful solution to the current conflict in the region and the two-state solution; and
WHEREAS, The United Nations has repeatedly declared Israeli settlements in violation of international law; now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED, That the Congress here assembled condemn Israeli settlements in disputed territories; and, be it
FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Congress here assembled pass legislation to stop any further American funding for the propagation of settlements.
 
Arms Accountability Act 
BE IT ENACTED BY THE CONGRESS HERE ASSEMBLED THAT:
SECTION 1.        The United States will implement the following reforms to improve the transparency of international sales of arms and weapons.
A.          Section 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act is amended to ensure the following items are included in Annual Military Assistance Report: 
a.           Detailed data on commercial sales agreements and deliveries
b.           Specifications on the total number of units exported to each country
c.           A revised version of commodity categories within the report to remove current ambiguity.
d.           A publically available version of the report that reports all transfers except those deemed classified.
B.          Submission of detailed data on transfers of small arms and light weapons to the UN Arms Register is now required by all 50 states.
SECTION 2.        Arms transfers and sales refer to the transfer of defense articles and defense services by the U.S. government under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to another country.
SECTION 3.        The Department of State will implement this legislation, and delegate duties to other departments as it sees fit.
SECTION 4.        This law will go into effect in Fiscal Year 2018.
SECTION 5.        All laws in conflict with this legislation are hereby declared null and void.
 
SUPER CONGRESS LEGISLATION
 
A Resolution to Prioritize Education Reform
 
WHEREAS, Educational failures put the United States’ future economic success, global influence, and national defense at risk; and
WHEREAS, According to a new Council on Foreign Relations report on U.S. Education Reform and National Security, “The United States invests more in K-12 public education than many other developed countries, yet U.S. students remain poorly prepared to compete with global peers.  The Program for International Student Assessment, according to the 2009 PISA, U.S. students ranked fourteenth in reading, twenty-fifth in math, and seventeenth in science compared to students in other developed countries”; and
WHEREAS, Economic Growth and Competitiveness, Physical Safety, Intellectual Property, U.S. Global Awareness, U.S. Unity and Cohesion are put at risk if no one takes action; and
WHEREAS, U.S. concentration on soldier readiness once they become soldiers is misguided in that potential soldiers need to be educationally prepared as students; and
WHEREAS, Large groups of undereducated citizens interfere with the nation’s ability to defend its global standing; now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED, That the Congress here assembled shall shift focus from military reform to education reform.
 
A Resolution to Mediate the Nagorno-Karabakh Dispute to Prevent Further Conflict
 
WHEREAS, Armenia and Azerbaijan are currently on the brink of fighting over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, which has a large Armenian majority yet is under Azerbaijani control; and
WHEREAS, This conflict could potentially lead to the deaths and displacements of millions of citizens living within the region; and
WHEREAS, A conflict in the region will disrupt regional stability, create a new refugee crisis, and give Russia an opportunity to expand its influence in the Caucasus; now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED, That the Congress here assembled recommend that the State Department mediate the growing conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan; and  
FURTHER RESOLVED, That the United States provide monetary and humanitarian aid to the two governments to increase the stability of the region. 
 
 
 
A Resolution for the United States to Withdraw from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action  (Iran Nuclear Agreement)
 
WHEREAS, The United States negotiated a treaty with Iran to decrease that nation’s nuclear capabilities; and
WHEREAS, The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (to be referred to as the Iran Nuclear Agreement) merely slows the growth of Iran’s nuclear capabilities; and
WHEREAS, Iran and North Korea share a common goal of possessing and threatening to use nuclear weapons against the United States and our allies; and
WHEREAS, The United States Senate did not ratify the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action; now, therefore, be it
RESOLVED, That the Congress here assembled will withdraw the United States from all of the provisions of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action immediately upon passage of this resolution.
 
 
 

 

 


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