2017 University of Mississippi Tournament
Dates: 9/29/2017 - 9/30/2017

EVENT DESCRIPTIONS 

DEBATE EVENTS 

CONGRESSIONAL DEBATE 

  • Schools may pre-register no more than six (5) entries. Students entering Congressional Debate may only enter one (1) Flight A Event and two (2) Flight B Events. 
  • No substitutions will be made in Congressional Debate. If a student does not show up or chooses not to compete, the school will lose that seat. 
  • Laptop computers and iPad-type devices may be used by delegates, but if caught using the internet during the session, the delegate will be automatically disqualified. 
  • Each preliminary room will have 20 or less competitors. The total number advancing to the final Super Congress session will be determined by the number of preliminary chambers established. 
  • A copy of the bill book will be uploaded on this website and a copy emailed to each school registered in the tournament. Bill Books will not be supplied to delegates once they arrive on the Ole Miss campus.  You must bring your own copies 

LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATE (VARSITY AND NOVICE DIVISIONS) 

  • Varsity debaters will use the September/October LD Topic: Resolved: In the United States, national service ought to be compulsory. 
  • Novice Debaters will use the novice topic:  Resolved: Civil disobedience in a democracy is morally justified
  • The debate will follow the standard 6-3-7-3-4-6-3 format. 
  • Each debater has four minutes of prep time to use as they wish. 
  • Four preliminary rounds will determine breaks to elimination rounds. 
  • A novice debater is a competitor in their first year of forensics competition in ANY event. 
  • Laptop computers and iPad-type devices may be used by debaters, but if caught using the internet during rounds, the competitor will be automatically disqualified from the event, not the round. 

POLICY DEBATE 

  • The 2017-2018 Policy Debate topic is:  Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its funding and/or regulation of elementary and/or secondary education in the United States. 
  • Three preliminary rounds will determine breaks to elimination rounds. This also depends on the number of entries and pace of the tournament. 
  • The debate will follow the standard 8-3-8-3-8-3-8-3-5-5-5-5 format. 
  • Each team has five minutes of prep time to use as they wish. 
  • The competition may use open or closed cross examination based on the preference of the judge(s). 
  • Laptop computers and iPad-type devices may be used by debaters, but if caught using the Internet during round, the competitor will be automatically disqualified from the event, not the round. 
  •   

PUBLIC FORUM DEBATE 

  • September/October PF topic is:  Resolved: Deployment of anti-missile systems is in South Korea’s best interest. 
  • The debate will follow the 4-4-3-4-4-3-2-2-3-2-2 format. 
  • Each team will have 2 minutes of prep time to use as they wish. 
  • Four preliminary rounds will determine breaks to elimination rounds. 
  • Debaters shall have a coin toss in the presence of the judges with the team winning the coin toss determining whether it will choose which side to uphold or whether it will speak first. The loser of the toss will have the other choice. 
  • Laptop computers and iPad-type devices may be used by debaters, but if caught using the Internet during round, the competitor will be automatically disqualified from the event, not the round. 

INDIVIDUAL EVENTS 

 

NOVICE RULE: NOVICES ARE STUDENTS IN THEIR FIRST YEAR OF COMPETITION. 

 

 VARSITY/NOVICE EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING 

  • The tournament director shall prepare a list of topics on current foreign and domestic issues. The student will draw three questions and return two before he/she begins his/her preparation period. 
  • The student will have thirty minutes of time to prepare his/her speech but must do so independently in a supervised environment. 
  • The student will have a maximum of seven minutes to present his/her speech. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than 30 seconds should not be given first place in a panel. 
  • The student may use one note card with a maximum of fifty words on it. 
  • The student is responsible for providing his/her own extemp file, which may include published books, magazines, newspapers, and journals or articles from those sources, provided they are intact originals or copies of the originals and that there is no written material on the original or the copy. The student may prepare a topical index without annotation for his/her use. 
  • Extemporaneous Speaking files will be inspected by tournament staff at some point before or during the competition. 
  • Laptop computers or iPAD-type devices may be used by extempers, but if caught using the internet during prep, every member of the school is responsible for the rule infraction and will be disqualified. 

ORIGINAL ORATORY 

  • The oration shall be no more than ten minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than 30 seconds should not be given first place in the panel. 
  • The oration may be on any appropriate subject and must be the original work of the student. 
  • No more than 150 words of the oration may be a direct quotation from any other speech or writing. 
  • An original copy of the Oratory must be present at the tournament for verification purposes. 
  • The performance must be memorized. 

 DUO INTERPRETATION 

  • This selection shall be no more than ten minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than thirty second should not be given first place in a panel. 
  • An introduction must be given and is included in the time limit. The two students should participate equally in the introduction. 
  • The selection shall be a cutting from a single published work of literature. Recorded material that is not published is not acceptable. Lines which are attributed to one character in the published material may not be attributed to another character in the performance. The original of the piece must be present at the tournament for verification purposes. 
  • Participants will establish focus for the other character, but except for during the introduction, eye contact is not allowed. 
  • The selection must be memorized. 
  • The two performers may play one or more characters as long as the performances of the two performers remain as balanced as possible. 
  • Participants should react to each other’s verbal and non-verbal expressions, but they may not touch each other. 

 POETRY INTERPRETATION 

  • This selection shall require not more than ten minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than thirty second should not be given first place in a panel. 
  • A reader may read more than one selection, but appropriate transitional material is required and is a part of the ten-minute time limit. 
  • A manuscript is required. 
  • An introduction must be given and is included in the time limit. All authors and poems used must be named in the introduction. 
  • The poetry must come from a published source which must be present at the tournament for verification purposes. 
  • The selection must be memorized. 

 HUMOROUS INTERPRETATION 

  • The selection shall require not more than ten minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than thirty seconds should not be given first in a panel. 
  • An introduction must be given and is included in the time limit. 
  • The selection shall be a cutting from a published work such as a novel, short story, play, or poetry. Recorded material that is not printed and published is prohibited. Monologues are acceptable. The original source of the piece must be present at the tournament for verification purposes. 
  • The selection must be memorized. Students may move one step in any direction but should remember that this is a contest in interpretation, not in solo acting. 
  • The selection must be memorized. 

  

IMPROMPTU SPEAKING 

  • The total time given to each speaker shall not exceed seven minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than 30 seconds should not be given first place in a panel. Participants will use this time for both preparation and delivery. The time begins immediately after the student selects her/his topic. 
  • Students may take notes during their preparation but may not have their notes with them during the delivery of the speech. 
  • The judge will show the student his/her three topic choices from which the student will select one which he/she will prepare and deliver within his/her allotted seven-minute period. 
  • Once a participant has seen the topics he/she must remain in the room and may not converse with any other individual until his/her presentation is completed. 
  • The tournament director shall prepare topics which are varied, coming from such areas as objects holidays, aphorisms, abstract nouns, famous people, fictional people, or any other thematic group that is appropriate for high school students. Participants are encouraged to relate to the topic by adapting it to a thesis they develop. 

  DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION 

  • The selection shall require not more than ten minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than 30 seconds should not be given first place in a panel. 
  • The selection should be a cutting from a published work such as a novel, short story, play, or poetry. Recorded material that is not printed and published is prohibited. Monologues are acceptable. The original source of the piece must be present at the tournament for verification purposes. 
  • The selection must be serious in tone. 
  • The selection must be memorized. Students may move one step in any direction but should remember that this is a contest in interpretation, not in a solo acting. 

 PROSE INTERPRETATION 

  • The selection shall require no more than ten minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than 30 seconds should not be given first place in the panel. 
  • An introduction must be given and is included in the time limit. 
  • Prose includes fiction (short stories, novels) and non-fiction (articles, essays, journals, biographies). 
  • A manuscript is required. 
  • The prose must come from a single published source, the original of which must be present at the tournament for verification purposes. 

 DUET ACTING 

  • Selections shall be cuttings from a single source - from a published novel, short story, play, poem or screenplay. No contestant may use the same literary work that s/he used in previous competitive years. 
  • The material may be humorous, dramatic, or a combination of the two. 
  • Each performer may play one or more characters so long as performance responsibility in the cutting remains as balanced as possible. 
  • And introduction is required and is part of the time limit. 
  • The selection shall require no more than ten minutes. There is a 30 second grace period. Students who exceed the time limit by more than 30 seconds should not be given first place in the panel. 
  • The interpretation must be delivered from memory; no notes, prompting or scripts shall be permitted. No costumes or props shall be permitted. During the performance, on-stage focus (meaning contestants MAY look directly at each other) may and/or should be employed by both contestants. Contestants are encouraged to touch and make eye contact during any part of the performance. Two chairs will be allowed for use as props or to facilitate blocking and to create levels, atmosphere and environment. 

 INFORMATIVE SPEAKING 

 

  • Students deliver a self-written, ten-minute speech on a topic of their choosing. Limited in their ability to quote words directly, Informative Speaking competitors craft a speech using evidence, logic, and optional visual aids. All topics must be informative in nature; the goal is to educate, not to advocate. The speech is delivered from memory. 
  • The commonality among most Informative Speaking structures is the presence of an introduction, three main points, and a conclusion. Where speeches differ is what the three main points contain. As opposed to Oratory, where you generally have some combination of problems, causes, and solutions, Informative has a less concrete direction that each speech can follow. Typically, the third main point will be implications, or what your topic means to society as a whole. To begin developing a structure, brainstorm what you find interesting about your topic, and write down a list of things you would like to include in your speech. From there, go through the list and start separating it into six different categories. Try to make the categories broad enough to contain lots of information, but distinct enough to keep them separate from one another.  

PROGRAM ORAL INTERPRETATION (POI) 

  • Using a combination of Prose, Poetry and Drama, students construct a program up to ten minutes in length using at least two out of the three genres 
  • The focus of the event is development of a single theme or argument through the use of narrative, story, and/or characterization.  
  • Competitors are expected to portray multiple characters.  
  • No props or costumes may be used, however, the manuscript book may be used as a propr.  
  • Performances also include an introduction written by the student to contextualize the performance and state the titles and authors used in the program. 

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